Category Archives: DoD

You Do Realize that the U.S. Funded and Trained ISIS, Right?

Melissa Melton The Daily Sheeple
August 22nd, 2014

ISIS-Flag-In-Iraq-300x300


Just so we are all clear here.

Now that ISIS, or the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, is becoming a threat so powerful Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told reporters at the Pentagon that the terrorist group is “beyond anything we’ve seen,” it’s time to remind everyone of a few little factoids regarding how exactly that came to be.

Hagel’s exact quote was:

“They are beyond just a terrorist group. They marry ideology, a sophistication of … military prowess. They are tremendously well-funded. This is beyond anything we’ve seen.”

Well-trained in military prowess. Tremendously well-funded. Super sophisticated terrorists. Hm.

And how do you think they got that way so fast? Super magic terrorist training money tree fairy dust?

Apparently the mainstream establishment media would more likely attempt to have people believe such a thing exists rather than expose the blatant reality that yes, the U.S. has trained and funded ISIS and without the U.S. government, ISIS would not be the threat it has become.

It came out back in 2012 that the U.S., Turkey and Jordan were jointly running a US CIA and Special Forces command training base for Syrian rebels out of the Jordanian town of Safawi, but apparently according the Jordanian officials, that training ‘wasn’t meant to be used in Iraq’ (via WND):

Syrian rebels who would later join the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIS, were trained in 2012 by U.S. instructors working at a secret base in Jordan, according to informed Jordanian officials.
The officials said dozens of future ISIS members were trained at the time as part of covert aid to the insurgents targeting the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Syria. The officials said the training was not meant to be used for any future campaign in Iraq.

So future ISIS members were specially trained by the U.S. government, huh? Ya don’t say. But they weren’t supposed to be used for campaigns in Iraq?

Oops.

This was, at least superficially, so they could wage war against the Bashar al-Assad regime in Syria, and again, they weren’t called ISIS at the time, they were referred to as the Syrian rebels.

But the government won’t even admit what they’ve done here. Instead, they’re just bombing Iraq and hoping for the best…

Meanwhile, our government is still funding the “Syrian rebels” today!

Back at the end of June, Obama was requesting another $500 million in aid for them, even though the fact that many were now calling themselves ISIS was so blatantly obvious even back then that it could no longer be disputed.

As Hagel said, ISIS are not just well-funded, but “tremendously well-funded.” Now you know where ISIS gets a hefty chunk of its tremendous funding.

This really isn’t that hard to figure out, just hard to comprehend; mostly because IT’S COMPLETELY INSANE.

Even worse, former state department official Andrew Doran let the cat out of the bag back in June that some of these ISIS members are actually combat veterans from Western nations including the U.S. who have passports and could return home anytime, basically asserting that ISIS could easily attack America at any time.

Of course, it isn’t like anyone would need a passport, what with the porous U.S.-Mexico border basically sitting there wide open.

A documentary maker recently even dressed up in an Osama Bin Laden mask and crossed the Southern border just to make the point.

Either way, this is madness.

Now we not only have Hagel telling America that ISIS is ‘beyond anything the Pentagon has ever seen’ but in the same week the former deputy director of the CIA is telling CBS This Morning that he fears ISIS is going to start carrying out 9/11-style attacks on American soil, including this little gem:

“If an ISIS member showed up at a mall in the United States tomorrow with an AK-47 and killed a number of Americans, I would not be surprised.”

If anyone is terrorizing America directly right now, it’s the American government that would first fund and train terrorists who are raping people and setting them on fire, crucifying Christians and beheading children, then conspire with the media to scare the American people that the government’s own terrorist creation is going to attack here 9/11-style RIGHT BEFORE ANOTHER 9/11 ANNIVERSARY.

Creating one’s own enemies then declaring war on them while putting the rest of the world in grave danger…

Again. This is madness.

And the lunatics are running the asylum.
Delivered by The Daily Sheeple


Contributed by Melissa Melton of The Daily Sheeple.

Melissa Melton is a writer, researcher, and analyst for The Daily Sheeple and a co-creator of Truthstream Media with Aaron Dykes, a site that offers teleprompter-free, unscripted analysis of The Matrix we find ourselves living in. Melissa also co-founded Nutritional Anarchy with Daisy Luther of The Organic Prepper, a site focused on resistance through food self-sufficiency. Wake the flock up!
Advertisements

$730 Million in Back Taxes Owed by U.S. Defense Workers with Security Clearances Viewed as Posing Risk

Wednesday, July 30, 2014, AllGov

Tens of thousands of federal workers with security clearances owe millions in back taxes, putting the information at their disposal or the facilities in which they work at risk, a government watchdog says.

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) found more than 80,000 employees and contractors at the Department of Defense holding security clearances owed the Internal Revenue Service $730 million in unpaid federal taxes as of 2012. And 31% of those people owed back taxes at the time they were granted clearances. That again raised concerns about what kind of job is being done to vet workers with security clearances in the wake of disclosures of secret material by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden and the Navy Yard shootings last year by Aaron Alexis, who killed 12 people. Both Snowden and Alexis had security clearances.

United States Investigative Services, which granted those clearances and thousands of others, was accused earlier this year by the Justice Department of failing to perform background checks on applicants. The company claims it has tightened controls and installed new management.

The GAO reported about 26,000 of the tax-delinquent employees and contractors had access to classified information. “DOD officials stated that individuals having access to classified information pose a greater risk because they have more opportunity to actually compromise classified information than a person who is only eligible to access classified information,” the GAO said in its report.

Senator Tom Coburn (R-Oklahoma), who has spoken out before on the problem of federal employees owing taxes, said in a statement: “Giving security clearances to individuals who fail to follow the law is unwise and risky. Federal tax cheats with security clearances jeopardize both our national and economic security, and could unnecessarily put our nation’s classified information at risk.”

Auditors also pointed out that federal agencies aren’t necessarily at fault for not knowing their workers owe the IRS because federal law prohibits the tax agency from disclosing taxpayer information to other agencies.

-Noel Brinkerhoff

 

To Learn More:

Defense Workers with Security Clearance Owed Millions in Back Taxes, GAO Finds (by Josh Hicks and Christian Davenport, Washington Post)

Federal Employees Owe $3.4 Billion in Back Taxes (by Noel Brinkerhoff and David Wallechinsky, AllGov) 

DoD Asked to Stop Using SPLC Hate Group’s Anti-Christian Training Materials

December 11, 2013

The Department of Defense (DOD) may be relying on a leftwing, anti-Christian civil rights outfit linked to domestic terrorism for training materials and a coalition of conservative groups is asking Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel to investigate.

The radical nonprofit, Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), providing the material labels conservatives who disagree with it on social issues hateful. In fact, its website features conservative organizations on a catalogue of “hate groups.”  
The hate catalogue made headlines last year when a domestic terrorist who carried out a politically-motivated shooting at a Christian organization, the Family Research Council (FRC), admitted he got his target list from the SPLC.
The shooter, Floyd Lee Corkins, stormed into the FRC’s Washington D.C. headquarters with the intention of killing as many employees as possible, according to a news report that cites legal documents. He shot an unarmed security guard at the FRC before the guard subdued him. Corkins pleaded guilty to three felonies, including committing an act of terrorism, and was sentenced to 25 years.
It may seem unfathomable that the U.S. government would use training materials provided by an organization like the SPLC, though records obtained by Judicial Watch earlier this year show the group is quite influential in the Obama administration. In fact, the files obtained by JW from the Obama Justice Department reveal that SPLC co-founder Morris Dees, conducted a “Diversity Training Event” for the agency.
Incredibly, the SPLC is also providing our military with supplies and briefings, according to various reports of training incidents in which Army instructors relied on the group’s anti-Christian materials. This evidently led Army Secretary John McHugh to issue an order a few months ago to “cease” the SPCL’s anti-Christian briefings in that branch of the military. 
The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) followed by declining to endorse the SPLC as a source.
But it appears that other branches of the U.S. military continue to use SPLC training materials and briefings. Led by the FRC, a coalition of conservative groups—including Judicial Watch— are asking Hagel to end the practice. In a letter to the Defense Secretary, the groups ask that installations stop relying on the SPLC and other non-governmental sources as approved resources for equal opportunity training.
“It is imperative that the Defense Equal Opportunity Institute (DEOMI) ensure future materials do not rely on information from organizations such as the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) or any others that engage in groundless and highly pejorative mischaracterizations of long-standing ministries and organizations for their own political purposes,” the letter says.

Source judicialwatch
See our: The SPLC Collaborates With The DOJ: It Is NOT A Coincidence!

See our full dossier on the SPLC  of 34 posts.

US pushing local cops to stay mum on surveillance

Guess who leads the way? Yep, Florida ….again! Gradually, but ever so steadily DC is federalizing our state governments.

US pushing local police departments to keep quiet on cell-phone surveillance technology
This photo taken June 11, 2014 shows the Berkshire Manor Apartments in Tallahassee, Fla., one location where the “Stingray” surveillance device was used extensively by the Tallahassee Police Department. The Obama administration has been quietly advising local police not to disclose details about surveillance technology they are using to sweep up basic cellphone data from entire neighborhoods, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Phil Sears)
The Obama administration has been quietly advising local police not to disclose details about surveillance technology they are using to sweep up basic cellphone data from entire neighborhoods, The Associated Press has learned.
Citing security reasons, the U.S. has intervened in routine state public records cases and criminal trials regarding use of the technology. This has resulted in police departments withholding materials or heavily censoring documents in rare instances when they disclose any about the purchase and use of such powerful surveillance equipment.
Federal involvement in local open records proceedings is unusual. It comes at a time when President Barack Obama has said he welcomes a debate on government surveillance and called for more transparency about spying in the wake of disclosures about classified federal surveillance programs.
One well-known type of this surveillance equipment is known as a Stingray, an innovative way for law enforcement to track cellphones used by suspects and gather evidence. The equipment tricks cellphones into identifying their owners’ account information and transmitting data to police as if it were a phone company’s tower. That allows police to obtain cellphone information without having to ask for help from service providers, such as Verizon or AT&T, and can locate a phone without the user even making a call or sending a text message.
But without more details about how the technology works and under what circumstances it’s used, it’s unclear whether the technology might violate a person’s constitutional rights or whether it’s a good investment of taxpayer dollars.
Interviews, court records and public-records requests show the Obama administration is asking agencies to withhold common information about the equipment, such as how the technology is used and how to turn it on. That pushback has come in the form of FBI affidavits and consultation in local criminal cases.
“These extreme secrecy efforts are in relation to very controversial, local government surveillance practices using highly invasive technology,” said Nathan Freed Wessler, a staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, which has fought for the release of these types of records. “If public participation means anything, people should have the facts about what the government is doing to them.”
Harris Corp., a key manufacturer of this equipment, built a secrecy element into its authorization agreement with the Federal Communications Commission in 2011. That authorization has an unusual requirement: that local law enforcement “coordinate with the FBI the acquisition and use of the equipment.” Companies like Harris need FCC authorization in order to sell wireless equipment that could interfere with radio frequencies.
A spokesman from Harris Corp. said the company will not discuss its products for the Defense Department and law enforcement agencies, although public filings showed government sales of communications systems such as the Stingray accounted for nearly one-third of its $5 billion in revenue. “As a government contractor, our solutions are regulated and their use is restricted,” spokesman Jim Burke said.
Local police agencies have been denying access to records about this surveillance equipment under state public records laws. Agencies in San Diego, Chicago and Oakland County, Michigan, for instance, declined to tell the AP what devices they purchased, how much they cost and with whom they shared information. San Diego police released a heavily censored purchasing document. Oakland officials said police-secrecy exemptions and attorney-client privilege keep their hands tied. It was unclear whether the Obama administration interfered in the AP requests.
“It’s troubling to think the FBI can just trump the state’s open records law,” said Ginger McCall, director of the open government project at the Electronic Privacy Information Center. McCall suspects the surveillance would not pass constitutional muster.
“The vast amount of information it sweeps in is totally irrelevant to the investigation,” she said.
A court case challenging the public release of information from the Tucson Police Department includes an affidavit from an FBI special agent, Bradley Morrison, who said the disclosure would “result in the FBI’s inability to protect the public from terrorism and other criminal activity because through public disclosures, this technology has been rendered essentially useless for future investigations.”
Morrison said revealing any information about the technology would violate a federal homeland security law about information-sharing and arms-control laws — legal arguments that that outside lawyers and transparency experts said are specious and don’t comport with court cases on the U.S. Freedom of Information Act.
The FBI did not answer questions about its role in states’ open records proceedings.
But a former Justice Department official said the federal government should be making this argument in federal court, not a state level where different public records laws apply.
“The federal government appears to be attempting to assert a federal interest in the information being sought, but it’s going about it the wrong way,” said Dan Metcalfe, the former director of the Justice Department’s office of information and privacy. Currently Metcalfe is the executive director of American University’s law school Collaboration on Government Secrecy project.
A criminal case in Tallahassee cites the same homeland security laws in Morrison’s affidavit, court records show, and prosecutors told the court they consulted with the FBI to keep portions of a transcript sealed. That transcript, released earlier this month, revealed that Stingrays “force” cellphones to register their location and identifying information with the police device and enables officers to track calls whenever the phone is on.
One law enforcement official familiar with the Tucson lawsuit, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak about internal discussions, said federal lawyers told Tucson police they couldn’t hand over a PowerPoint presentation made by local officers about how to operate the Stingray device. Federal officials forwarded Morrison’s affidavit for use in the Tucson police department’s reply to the lawsuit, rather than requesting the case be moved to federal court.
In Sarasota, Florida, the U.S. Marshals Service confiscated local records on the use of the surveillance equipment, removing the documents from the reach of Florida’s expansive open-records law after the ACLU asked under Florida law to see the documents. The ACLU has asked a judge to intervene. The Marshals Service said it deputized the officer as a federal agent and therefore the records weren’t accessible under Florida law.

Holder to create homegrown terrorism task force

We don’t read of any contrivances submitted by the SPLC to Holder’s project in this report, but you can be sure they’re into it up to their fisted hand salutes.
June 4, 2014  12:49 PM EDT
Attorney General Eric Holder unveiled his plan to create a new Justice Department task force this week that will focus on the threat of “homegrown” terrorism
By Mikael Thalen | Storyleak
In a video posted to the department’s website Monday, which was later removed, Holder argued that the focus on terrorism should “return” to the U.S. as opposed to remaining overseas.
“We face an escalating danger from self-radicalized individuals within our own borders,” Holder said. “As the nature of the threat we face evolves to include the possibility of individual radicalization via the Internet, it is critical that we return our focus to potential extremists here at home.”
The “Domestic Terrorism Executive Committee,” an admittedly revamped version of Janet Reno’s post Oklahoma City bombing task force, will include U.S. Attorneys as well as members from the FBI and Justice Department’s National Security Division.
Holder pointed to a 2013 Congressional Research Service report that claims domestic terrorism has produced more than two dozen incidents since 9/11 as justification for the task force, specifically noting the Boston Marathon bombing and Fort Hood shooting.
“Horrific terror incidents like the tragic shootings at Fort Hood and last year’s Boston Marathon bombing demonstrate the danger we face from these homegrown threats,” Holder said.
Holder’s announcement comes only days after The Washington Times revealed a chilling Department of Defense directive that details instances in which President Obama believes he would be authorized to use lethal military force against American citizens. A U.S. official speaking with the Times also revealed how the Obama administration considered using military force against Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and his supporters.
Unsurprisingly, Holder’s announcement fails to mention that the vast majority of domestic terror plots since 9/11 have been created by the FBI, a point noted in the 2012 New York Times piece “Terrorist Plots, Helped Along by the F.B.I.
In reality, Holder’s task force will undoubtedly focus on the Obama administration’s political enemies, mainly returning military veterans, conservatives and those who identify with the Tea Party. Such groups have been increasingly linked to terrorism by multiple federal agencies.
Just last month, a military whistleblower revealed documents to Infowars that showed how a military training center in North Carolina, also used to train police and the DHS, was updated to include a Baptist church and farmhouses. Once modeled after foreign cities, training centers, such as the U.S. Army’s new 300-acre “fake city” in Virginia, are now being modeled after U.S. towns and cities instead.
Last October, Army troops at Mississippi’s Camp Shelby alerted media after a new training course labeled the American Family Association, a mainstream Christian ministry, as a domestic hate group similar to the Ku Klux Klan. A seperate briefing told officers to keep an eye on troops who supported such groups, insinuating that they were a domestic terror threat.
That same month, soldiers at Fort Hood were told that Christians, Tea Party supporters and anti-abortion activists were a major terror threat as well. Soldiers were told that support for such groups could result in disciplinary action under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.
Department of Defense training manual obtained by conservative watchdog Judicial Watch in August 2013 listed supporters of “individual liberties” as likely “extremists.”  The manual also warned military personnel to avoid  “active participation” in such groups, even banning them from “publicly demonstrating,” “rallying” and “fundraising.”
A 2012 report from the Small Wars Journal featured in Forbes even went as far as explaining “how the U.S. Military would crush a Tea Party rebellion.”
A Department of Homeland Security funded study uncovered in 2012 characterized Americans “suspicious of centralized federal authority” and “reverent of individual liberty” as “extreme right-wing” terrorists. The study also links Americans who believe their “way of life” is under attack to terrorism as well.
In line with President Obama’s DoD directive, a leaked US Army Military Police training manual from 2012 also outlined how the military would be used against U.S. citizens during civil unrest. The manual even detailed how Americans would be “re-educated” under U.S. Army FM 3-19.40 Internment/Resettlement Operations to support all U.S. policies.
Former Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano refused to disown a 2009 report that labeled returning military veterans as the main terror threat. Incredibly, a story in New York Times published during the same time period revealed how Boy Scout Explorers were being trained to kill “disgruntled Iraq war veterans.”
Holder’s decision becomes even more apparent in light of the Obama administrations recent decisions regarding foreign terrorism. In 2013, President Obama brazenly waived a federal law designed to stop the US from arming terrorists in order to provide military support to the Al-Qaeda run “Syrian rebels.”
Attempting to stay afloat in a sea of scandals, the Obama administration has become increasingly desperate to regain a positive public image. Given the documented history of the federal government’s involvement in facilitating terrorism, the administration will likely do whatever it can to create the necessary scenario to bolster its executive power.
(Photo: whitehouse.gov)
This article originally appeared on Storyleak.

Arms Cache Most Likely Kept in Texas by the C.I.A.

Camp Stanley in Boerne, Tex., on Friday. Credit Michael Stravato for The New York Times

 MAY 4, 2014

WASHINGTON — In passing references scattered through once-classified documents and cryptic public comments by former intelligence officials, it is referred to as “Midwest Depot,” but the bland code name belies the role it has played in some of the C.I.A.’s most storied operations.
From the facility, located somewhere in the United States, the C.I.A. has stockpiled and distributed untraceable weapons linked to preparations for the Bay of Pigs invasion and the arming of rebels and resistance fighters from Angola to Nicaragua to Afghanistan.
Yet despite hints that “Midwest” was not actually where it was located, the secrecy surrounding the C.I.A. armory has survived generations of investigations. In a 2007 essay on the 20th anniversary of the Iran-contra affair, for example, a congressional investigator noted that the facility where the C.I.A. had handled missiles bound for Iran remained classified even as other “incredible things were unveiled during the hearings.”
But three years ago, it became public that the C.I.A. had some kind of secret location at Camp Stanley, an Army weapons depot just north of San Antonio and the former Kelly Air Force Base, though its purpose was unclear. And now, a retired C.I.A. analyst, Allen Thomson, has assembled a mosaic of documentation suggesting that it is most likely the home of Midwest Depot.

In December, he quietly posted his research, which he has updated several times with additional clues, on the website of the Federation of American Scientists. In an email exchange, Mr. Thomson argued that the Midwest Depot’s history should be scrutinized.

“I have worried about the extent to which the U.S. has spread small arms around over the decades to various parties it supported,” he said. “Such weapons are pretty durable and, after the cause du jour passed, where did they go? To be a little dramatic about it, how many of those AK-47s and RPG-7s we see Islamists waving around today passed through the Midwest Depot on their way to freedom fighters in past decades?”
Spokesmen for the Pentagon and the C.I.A. declined to comment. A public affairs officer for Camp Stanley said its mission was to be a weapons storage and testing facility for the military.
There is no outward indication of what would be one of the C.I.A.’s three known facilities in the United States, along with its headquarters in Langley, Va., and Camp Peary, a military base near Williamsburg, Va., known by its code name, “The Farm,” that is believed to be used for training. Camp Stanley has a low-key gated entrance, and a few nondescript warehouses are visible from its perimeter fence. Rows of bunkers are nestled deeper into the base, according to satellite images.
The mayor of the nearby town of Boerne, Tex., Mike Schultz, said he knew nothing of any C.I.A. presence at Camp Stanley. Henry Cisneros, a former mayor of San Antonio who served as secretary of Housing and Urban Development, also said he had never heard speculation about a C.I.A. role there.
The existence of a C.I.A. facility at Camp Stanley first surfaced in 2011 because of lawsuits brought by Kevin Shipp, a C.I.A. official who had lived with his family in a government-owned house there a decade earlier. His family grew severely ill from exposure to a toxin, possibly from mold in the house, though the base is environmentally contaminated. Their possessions were destroyed.


Mr. Shipp filed a lawsuit against the C.I.A., but the Justice Department invoked the state-secrets privilege to block it, warning against disclosing to a consultant his identity or any connection between his employer and the location. The New York Times identified Camp Stanley as the C.I.A. site in 2011 based on the court records from a related insurance lawsuit.
Mr. Shipp also wrote a memoir, but a C.I.A. pre-publication review board blacked out large parts about his family’s experiences. His son, Joel Shipp, noting that he signed no confidentiality agreement, said he was writing his own memoir and wanted to sell the movie rights. He said he still suffered health problems from his teenage years, confirming that the C.I.A. had sent his family to Camp Stanley, which he called “a secret base which had been used for illegal arms running and chemical weapons storage.”
The 2011 Times article caught the eye of Mr. Thomson, who worked for the C.I.A. from 1972 to 1985 and now lives in San Antonio. He searched through declassified documents and old articles, accumulating clues.
Several of the documents he found traced Midwest Depot’s role without identifying its location, including a 1967 C.I.A. memo linking it to paramilitary training of Cuban exiles before the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, and a 1987 State Department memo showing that equipment bound for the Nicaraguan contras passed through it.
The Times separately identified a 1963 C.I.A. memo discussing 300 tons of C-4 plastic explosives that were available in the “Midwest Depot stocks.” There were no restrictions on its use “because the items have world-wide distribution and are consequently deniable.”
In a 2009 interview, a former C.I.A. logistics officer said AK-47 rifles sent to the Northern Alliance after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks came from the C.I.A.’s Midwest Depot stockpiles. Arms funneled to anti-Marxist fighters in the Angolan civil war in the 1970s did, too, another former C.I.A. official said this month, while emphasizing that he was never told its location.
But Mr. Thomson, who said he had not been read into classified information about Midwest Depot’s location when he worked at the C.I.A., identified a series of references in old news accounts, books and interviews placing a covert weapons depot near San Antonio.
And he found an explicit reference in a 1986 memo by Col. Oliver North, a chief figure in the Iran-contra affair. It said the C.I.A. would truck missiles bound for Iran from a military arsenal “to Midwest Depot, Texas,” for preparation, then fly them out of Kelly Air Force Base. Connecting Midwest Depot to yet another historical episode, it added that some missiles would go to “Afghan resistance” fighters battling the Soviets.
Camp Stanley has recently undergone a building boom of new warehouses. A March 2010 solicitation for environmental cleanup emphasized that workers needed security clearances. “The installation stores large quantities of arms and ammunition and has sensitive missions, thus access to the installation and security clearance requirements for long-term personnel are much more restrictive than most military installations,” it said.
Just last July, according to another document Mr. Thomson spotted, the Army sought to purchase two million rounds of ammunition of the caliber that fits AK-47 rifles, which American soldiers do not use. The delivery address: Camp Stanley.

Russian Su -24 scores off against the American "USS Donald Cook" in Black Sea

Americans need the ground version of the “Khibiny” for defense against their own government’s drones.



21 April, 09:59
Photo: RIA Novosti
Russian Sukhoi Su -24 with the newest jamming complex paralyzed in the Black Sea the most modern American combat management system “Aegis” installed on the destroyer “USS Donald Cook”.
Pavel Zolotarev, Deputy Director, Institute of USA and Canada, shares details about this version which is being actively discussed in the Russian media and by bloggers.
US destroyer “Donald Cook” with cruise missiles “Tomahawk” entered the neutral waters of the Black Sea on April 10. The purpose was a demonstration of force and intimidation in connection with the position of Russia in Ukraine and Crimea. The appearance of American warships in these waters is in contradiction of the Montreux Convention about the nature and duration of stay in the Black Sea by the military ships of countries not washed by this sea.
In response, Russia sent an unarmed bomber Su- 24 to fly around the U.S. destroyer. However, experts say that this plane was equipped with the latest Russian electronic warfare complex. According to this version, “Aegis” spotted from afar the approaching aircraft, and sounded alarm. Everything went normally, American radars calculated the speed of the approaching target. And suddenly all the screens went blank. “Aegis” was not working any more, and the rockets could not get target information. Meanwhile, Su-24 flew over the deck of the destroyer, did battle turn and simulated missile attack on the target. Then it turned and repeated the maneuver. And did so 12 times.
Apparently, all efforts to revive the “Aegis” and provide target information for the defence failed. Russia’s reaction to military pressure from the United States was profoundly calm, feels the Russian political scientist Pavel Zolotarev:
The demonstration was original enough. A bomber without any weapons, but having onboard equipment for jamming enemy radar, worked against a destroyer equipped with “Aegis”, the most modern system of air and missile defence. But this system of mobile location, in this case the ship, has a significant drawback. That is, the target tracking capabilities. They work well when there is a number of these ships which can coordinate with each other somehow. In this case there was just one destroyer. And, apparently, the algorithm of the radar in the “Aegis” system on the destroyer did not load under the influence of jamming by the Su-24. It was therefore not only a nervous reaction to the fact of flying around by the Russin bomber which was common practice during the Cold War. The reaction of the Americans was due to the fact that most modern system, especially its informative or radar part, did not work adequately. Therefore, there was such a nervous reaction to the whole episode.
After the incident, the foreign media reported that “Donald Cook” was rushed into a port in Romania. There all the 27 members of the crew filed a letter of resignation. It seems that all 27 people have written that they are not going to risk their lives. This is indirectly confirmed by the Pentagon statement according to which the action demoralized the crew of the American ship.
What are the possible consequences of the incident provoked by the U.S. in the Black Sea? Pavel Zolotarev forecasts:
I think that Americans are somehow going to reflect on improving the system “Aegis”. This is a purely military aspect. In political terms, there is hardly any likelihood of demonstrative steps by either side. That is enough. 

Meanwhile, for Americans it is a very unpleasant moment. In general, the missile defence system which they deploy involves huge expenditures. They have to prove each time that it is necessary to allocate funds from the budget. At the same time, the ground component of the ABM was tested in ideal conditions and showed a low efficiency. This fact is concealed by the Pentagon. The most modern component, the sea-based system “Aegis” also showed its shortcomings in the present case.

The system with which the Russian Su-24 shocked the American destroyer “Donald Cook” has the code name “Khibiny”. This is the name of the mountain range on the Kola Peninsula in the Arctic Circle. “Khibiny” is the newest complex for radioelectronic jamming of the enemy. They will be installed on all the advanced Russian planes .
Recently the complex has undergone regular testing exercises on the ground in Buryatia. Apparently, the tests which were conducted under conditions as close to real as possible, were successful.
via indian.ruvr.ru

 

U.S. Government Gives Out $164 Billion in Non-Competitive Contracts in One Year

You just know once this breaks your Republican congressional oversight committees will be all over it! Right.


Monday, March 31, 2014
via AllGov
(graphic: Edie, clker.com)
Although all federal contracts are supposed to be put out to bid, more than a third of them are non-competitive, that is there is only one vendor bidding on the chance to sell U.S. taxpayers goods and services.

The General Accounting Office (GAO) said that in fiscal 2013, the federal government agreed to $459 billion in contracts to purchase goods and services. Of that total, about $164 billion, or 35.7%, was in noncompetitive contracts.
There are several justifications the government can give for entering into a noncompetitive contract. One is that there is only one vendor qualified to provide the goods or service the government requires. But another is that there is an “unusual and compelling urgency” that requires the government to award the contract without competitive bidding. In these cases, there must be a risk of financial or other injury to the government caused by a delay in the competitive bidding process.
The GAO studied the urgency exception used in the years 2010 through 2012 by three federal entities: the Department of Defense, the Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Three percent of Defense’s noncompetitive contracts, amounting to $12.5 billion, fell under the urgency exception. The State Department had 12.5%t of its noncompetitive deals, worth $582 million attributed to urgency and USAID had only 1%, or about $20 million, under that category.
The most common use of the urgency provision in the Defense Department, according to an analysis by the Project on Government Oversight (POGO), were for combat operational needs in Iraq and Afghanistan and avoiding unanticipated gaps in program support.
The State Department and USAID used the urgency exception primarily to purchase services, such as security in State’s case and road construction for USAID, while the Defense Department relied on the exception about equally for goods and services.
The GAO report made several recommendations. It urged more guidance by the contracting agencies to its personnel in the use of correct procedures in using the urgency exception and to provide more oversight of the process. The report also recommended that the Office of Management and Budget provide guidance on the correct procedures to use when the duration of a contract awarded under the urgency exception exceeds one year.
-Steve Straehley
To Learn More:
Competition for Pentagon Contracts Declines (by Noel Brinkerhoff, AllGov)

Navy database tracks civilians raising new fears of domestic spying

Whether any action or intrusion on individual liberty is Constitutional or not, is no longer a consideration of the federal government or its agencies. Unless, of course, it is vigorously applied as a tool to protect them.


Navy database tracks civilians’ parking tickets, fender-benders, raising fears of domestic spying

By Mark Flatten | MARCH 21, 2014

A parking ticket, traffic citation or involvement in a minor fender-bender are enough to get a person’s name and other personal information logged into a massive, obscure federal database run by the U.S. military.

The Law Enforcement Information Exchange, or LinX, has already amassed 506.3 million law enforcement records ranging from criminal histories and arrest reports to field information cards filled out by cops on the beat even when no crime has occurred.
“That may be where you are starting to cross the line on mass collection of information on innocent people just because you can.”
LinX is a national information-sharing hub for federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. It is run by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, raising concerns among some military law experts that putting such detailed data about ordinary citizens in the hands of military officials crosses the line that generally prohibits the armed forces from conducting civilian law enforcement operations.
Those fears are heightened by recent disclosures of the National Security Agency spying on Americans, and the CIA allegedly spying on Congress, they say.
Eugene Fidell, who teaches military law at Yale Law School, called LinX “domestic spying.”
“It gives me the willies,” said Fidell, a member of the Defense Department’s Legal Policy Board and a board member of the International Society for Military Law and the Law of War.
Fidell reviewed the Navy’s LinX website at the request of the Washington Examiner to assess the propriety of putting such a powerful database under the control of a military police entity.
“Clearly, it cannot be right that any part of the Navy is collecting traffic citation information,” Fidell said. “This sounds like something from a third-world country, where you have powerful military intelligence watching everybody.”
The military has a history of spying on Americans. The Army did it during the Vietnam War and the Air Force did it after the Sept. 11 terror attacks.
Among the groups subjected to military spying in the name of protecting military facilities from terrorism was a band of Quakers organizing a peace rally in Florida.
LinX administrators say it is nothing more than an information-sharing network that connects records from participating police departments across the country.
LinX was created in 2003 and put under NCIS, which has counterterrorism and intelligence-gathering missions in addition to responsibility for criminal investigations. LinX was originally supposed to help NCIS protect naval bases from terrorism.
More than 1,300 agencies participate, including The FBI and other Department of Justice divisions, the Department of Homeland Security and the Pentagon. 
Police departments along both coasts and in Texas, New Mexico, Alaska and Hawaii are in LinX.
The number of records in the system has mushroomed from about 50 million in 2007 to more than 10 times that number today.
Background checks for gun sales and applications for concealed weapons permits are not included in the system, according to NCIS officials and representatives of major state and local agencies contacted by the Examiner.
The director of NCIS, Andrew Traver, drew stiff opposition from the National Rifle Association after President Obama twice nominated him to be head of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
The nomination failed to go forward in the Senate both times, largely because of what the NRA described as Traver’s advocacy for stricter gun laws.
He became NCIS director in October.
NCIS officials could not say how much has been spent on LinX since it was created 2003. They provided figures since the 2008 fiscal year totaling $42.3 million. Older records are not available from NCIS.
Incomplete data from USAspending.gov shows at least $7.2 million more was spent between 2003 and 2008. The actual figure is probably much higher, since the spending listed on the disclosure site only totals $23 million since 2003.
Other law enforcement databases have limited information on things like criminal histories, said Kris Peterson, LinX division chief at NCIS.
More detailed narratives and things like radio dispatch logs and pawn shop records don’t show up in those databases, but are available in LinX, he said.
Participating agencies must feed their information into the federal data warehouse and electronically update it daily in return for access.
Why LinX wound up in the NCIS, a military law enforcement agency, is not clear. Current NCIS officials could not explain the reasoning, other than to say it grew out of the department’s need for access to law enforcement records relevant to criminal investigations.
A 2008 investigation into the removal of nine U.S. attorneys during the George W. Bush administration found that an overly aggressive push for DOJ to embrace LinX led to the firing of John McKay, then the U.S. attorney for western Washington state.

Finish reading

Why is the CIA Fighting Release of Documents Relating to 4 Planes that Went Missing in 1980?

Saturday, March 15, 2014
Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly 

(AP Photo)
A federal judge has told the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and other federal offices to continue looking for records pertaining to the disappearance of four transport planes in 1980.

The case was brought before Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly by plaintiff Stephen Whitaker, who has attempted to obtain information about four DC-3 aircraft, one of which was flown by his father, Harold William Whitaker.
Stephen Whitaker filed Freedom of Information Act requests with the CIA, as well as the Department of Defense and the State Department, to learn if they possessed records that might explain what happened to the DC-3s.
The CIA refused to tell Whitaker if its archives held any relevant documents pertaining to his search. The agency cited various exemptions under federal law, including the CIA Act of 1949 (pdf), which allow it to avoid responding to certain FOIA inquiries.
Whitaker argued in his lawsuit that the CIA improperly invoked FOIA Exemption (b) (3) (pdf), which authorizes the agency to keep from revealing information on agency “functions” and “intelligence sources and methods.”
Kollar-Kotelly sided with Whitaker, ruling (pdf) that “the CIA has too broadly applied the CIA Act to withhold information pursuant to Exemption (b) (3).” However, she agreed with two other exemptions cited by the CIA that pertain to attorney-client privilege and the withholding of personnel and medical records.
The plaintiff’s search for information seems to be both personal and more.
He said the plane piloted by his father disappeared somewhere over Spain in October 1980. It had been purchased at auction from the Spanish Air Force and was being flown to Germany to become part of a museum.
A report from Spain’s Civil Aviation Commission on Accidents says the aircraft’s instruments may not have been fully functional, and that the radio may only have been capable of sending messages but not receiving them.
The report added that there was no record of a distress call from the pilot, or co-pilot Lawrence Eckmann, a major in the U.S. Army.
Stephen Whitaker also sought records from the government about Eckmann. The State Department claimed its search turned up nothing on Eckmann. The plaintiff challenged this assertion, and Kollar-Kotelly agreed that Eckmann had been excluded from the search, which was found to be “inadequate and should have been revised….”
The plaintiff seems to suspect that some of the DC-3s he has sought information on were used by the CIA in its covert operations.
His FOIA request to the spy agency asked for any information that would reveal whether
“any of these persons or aircraft were later found to be employed or contracted by the CIA for service in Central America or elsewhere.”
The CIA has a long history of using DC-3s that ranges from the Vietnam War to the recent conflict in Libya that ousted dictator Muammar al-Gaddafi.
-Noel Brinkerhoff
To Learn More:
Missing-Plane Records From 1980 Dissected (by Kevin Lessmiller, Courthouse News Service)
Stephen Whitaker v. Central Intelligence Agency (U.S. District Court, District of Columbia) (pdf)